Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology
Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology - Structure of the human Ndc80 kinetochore complex around microtubules
Division of Cell and Developmental Biology
Division of Cell and Developmental Biology - Impaired trafficking of Notch in neoplastic ESCRT mutant Drosophila cells
Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis
Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis - Salmonella typhimurium growing within a macrophage
Division of Neurobiology
Division of Neurobiology - Phosphorylation of mTOR in neurons in the striatum

Recent News

Professor John Ngai and Professors Richard Kramer and Ehud Isacoff are the recipients of two NIH grants awarded as part of President Obama's BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies).

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Professor Mary Claire King is the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Lasker~Koshland Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science for her work discovering the BRCA1 breast-cancer gene.  King made her discovery while she was a faculty member at UC Berkeley in the School of Public Health and in the Department of Molecular & Cell Biology.

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While working as a Professor in MCB's Division of Immunology, Dr. Jim Allison developed the immunotherapy drug Yervoy (Ipilimumab), the first drug to improve overall survival for patients with advanced metastatic melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Yervoy was an informative feature story for the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) that describes both the research and the technology transfer process.

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Professor of Neurobiology and Director of the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute Ehud Isacoff has received an NSF Early Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) Award to develop a new technology that uses light to tweak the synapses of brain cells to determine how they process information during learning and memory.

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The Department of Molecular and Cell Biology (MCB) is soliciting applications for a new faculty member studying the biology of cancer; this position is open at any level (tenure-track or tenured). We seek candidates interested in the mechanisms of cancer and treatment of this disease with a primary focus on human cancer or mammalian models. Areas of interest include (but are not limited to) the genetics and epigenetics of cancer in humans or mouse models, tumor-host interactions, tumor metastasis, tumor immunology, cancer genomics, and the use of mouse models to dissect mechanisms of tumor initiation and progression.

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