Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology
Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology - Structure of the human Ndc80 kinetochore complex around microtubules
Division of Cell and Developmental Biology
Division of Cell and Developmental Biology - Impaired trafficking of Notch in neoplastic ESCRT mutant Drosophila cells
Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis
Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis - Salmonella typhimurium growing within a macrophage
Division of Neurobiology
Division of Neurobiology - Phosphorylation of mTOR in neurons in the striatum

Recent News

Howard Hughes Investigator and Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology Christopher Chang, and Associate Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology Michelle Chang, along with their colleague Peidon Yang, have made a potentially game-changing breakthrough in artificial photosynthesis. 

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Time Magazine has just named Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology Jennifer Doudna as one of the 100 Most Influential People of 2015. She and Emmanuelle Charpentier were recognized for their discovery of using CRISPR-Cas9 to remove or add genetic material at will.

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Kaoru Saijo

Assistant Professor of Immunology and Pathogenesis Kaoru Saijo has been named a 2015 Searle Scholar along with 14 other talented young scientists from institutions all over the United States. 

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Professor (Affiliated) of Genetics, Genomics and Development Steve Brenner heads up a portion of a five-year research program that may deeply influence how states use a heel prick, the first step in newborn screening. Most state public health departments check the infant’s blood after the first day of life to see if something is dangerously wrong. However, as genome sequencing becomes faster and cheaper, the push is on to unravel a baby’s entire DNA code instead.

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Professor and biochemist Jennifer Doudna and Professor and biophysicist Eva Nogales led a study that showed how a CRISPR-Cas surveillance complex in the bacterial immune system is able to target specific sites on an RNA molecule for the destruction of invaders.

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